It’s all about the 80s for Sarah Lewis

Today we’d like to welcome friend of the WRs and all round 80’s addict, Sarah Lewis, to the blog.

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We’d love to start by asking you a little bit about your writing journey so far and what it was that inspired you to write your first book?

I suppose you could say that I started writing my first book 30 years ago. It’s just taken me a while to get it finished! I’ve loved music for as long as I can remember – one of my earliest memories is dancing along to the Bay City Rollers when they were on Top of the Pops, when I was about 5. When Bob Geldof and Paula Yates moved to my home town of Faversham, when I was 11, my interest in the music industry and the people in it was piqued even further. By the age of 13, I had begun to meet a number of artists, including Midge Ure, Gary Kemp and Simon Le Bon, and I began to write to other musicians, with a view to putting together a book based on their replies. That love of music, popular culture, and the fantastic decade in which I grew up all inspired my first book, ‘My Eighties’.

Can you tell us a bit about your second book – Your Eighties – please?

It follows a similar format to the first book, in that it’s a combination of memories, anecdotes and celebrity interviews. However, instead of the memories and anecdotes being mine, they are ones they have been sent to me via my website, my blog, Twitter and Facebook. It has been fascinating putting the book together, hearing and reading other people’s recollections of the decade, and even being reminded of a few forgotten gems. To discuss the Eighties with fellow fans (there are a lot of us out there!) is always a real pleasure, and it I have the privilege of being able to share those discussions with a wider audience.

Of course, there have also been the interviews with some of the decade’s favourite faces, including Buster Bloodvessel, Martin Fry, Ranking Roger, Erkan Mustafa (Grange Hill’s Roland Browning), and Musical Youth’s Dennis Seaton and Michael Grant, which have been a blast! Transcribing the interviews afterwards, not so much. Despite what some may think, I really don’t like the sound of my own voice, and it drives me crazy when I have to listen to a section repeatedly, to ensure I’m quoting accurately.

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Do you have any writing habits or superstitions e.g. writing in the same place, using a certain pen, times of day etc?

Most of my writing tends to take place after 9pm, when I just get lost in what I’m doing. I’ll check the time after what seems like an hour, to find it’s gone 1am! Usually, I’ll be in my office at the back of the house, and will have music playing in the background – anything from classical to Meatloaf, depending on my mood, and what I’m writing. If I’m researching or editing, I’ll do so during the day, and tend to follow the sun – I start off in my office, then as the sun moves round, I move to the desk in my bedroom. During the summer, I’ll work outside as much as possible – you can’t beat the al fresco office. Again, usually accompanied by music or the radio.

Do you ever get writer’s block and, if so, how do you tackle this?

The short answer is “Yes, and not very well!” There was a point when I was writing ‘Your Eighties’ when I just hit a wall. I had a stack of research notes, some amazing submissions from 80’s fans, and a few interviews transcribed, but I couldn’t write. At first, I tried doing something completely different, to ‘free the writer’. However, having cleaned my house from top to bottom, tackled an enormous pile of ironing (which I hate), and begun to de-clutter an overloaded garage, I realised I was merely procrastinating. So, I forced myself to write. I wrote anything I could think of, even if it was as basic as “last night I went to a gig, then I went backstage and I interviewed…”. It’s a lot easier to edit something that is badly written than nothing at all. I think the key is to keep the flow and momentum going. I have pens and piles of scrap paper scattered throughout the house, just in case inspiration should strike. Often, my moments of clarity come just as I’m dropping off to sleep, so I’ve become particularly adept at scribbling notes in the dark! I also carry a small notebook around with me. Struck with an opening line whilst driving, I spent 5 minutes the other day saying the same sentence over and over, until I found a safe place for me to pull over and jot down the idea.

What are you working on now and what are your writing aspirations?

I have just begun working on the third book in the 80’s trilogy, ‘More Eighties’, and I’ve recently started a weekly 80’s column in the Canterbury Times. You can check out my first post here. As far as writing aspirations go, I would love to write the biography for a musician from the Eighties. I have a couple of people in mind, but I haven’t approached them yet.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERADo you see your future books continuing to focus entirely on the 80s or might you diversify?

As much as I love, and indeed live, the 80s, I’m always up for a bit of diversity. It would have to be something completely different though, not just a different era. I love the interviewing and research stages of writing, so anything that allowed me to do that would be great. If it involves visiting sunny climes, even better. Maybe something on the people and history of one of the Greek islands.

What’s the most amazing experience you’ve had as a result of researching the content of your books?

It has to be all the interviews I’ve done at gigs. Not only do I get to hear some of the most amazing live music, but I love the insight into the whole set up. Listening to sound checks, being backstage and seeing what goes on behind the scenes, chatting to some incredibly talented and creative musicians – what a thrill! Plus, I don’t think I’ll ever get tired of saying “I’m with the band”!

Who was your favourite person to interview?

That is a really tricky question, because I have truly enjoyed every interview I’ve done for both books. It’s always good when you feel you can ask an interviewee anything, so from that perspective, I would have to say Steve Blacknell and Erkan Mustafa, both of whom answered my questions with extreme candour. One of the easiest interviews I did was with Owen Paul, for ‘‘My Eighties’. He has loads of interesting stories to tell, and I really only had to say ‘Hello’, and he was off and running! However, I think my favourite interview to date has to be with Dr & The Medics. From the second I stepped into their dressing room, it was non-stop banter and laughter. Clive Jackson (the Doctor) and bass player Jon Randle were like a comedy duo. When you read that part of the book, you’ll see it was a ‘no holds barred’ kind of interview. My face was hurting from laughing so much.

Who’s the most famous person you have in your contacts list?

Now, that would be telling! All I will say is that my teenage self would have fainted if she’d seen some of the numbers I’ve got. There are some more famous names in the pipeline for ‘More Eighties’, as that contact list keeps on growing.

Do you ever get nervous when you interview people?My Eighties

Luckily, I’m quite good at compartmentalising, so even though I can be ridiculously excited or nervous before an interview, as soon as I walk into that room it’s like a switch flicks, and I go into ‘professional’ mode. Well, at least I hope that’s how I come across! I become so focussed on what they’re telling me (often fascinating insights), that I almost forget who I’m talking to. It’s only afterwards when I look back and think ‘Wow, did that really happen?’ The only person I’ve met, who’s given me an attack of nerves, was Jimmy White. I’d been to see him play a snooker match a couple of years ago, and bumped into him in the bar afterwards. I was shaking when I had my photo taken with him!

How important has social media been to your writing journey?

I would say it has been invaluable. Twitter especially has been a fantastic means of engaging with 80’s fans, and getting feedback on a particular topic. I must confess to being something of a Twitter addict (you can follow me @MyEighties). It’s wonderful to be listening to a radio show like Forgotten 80s, and discussing it in real time with fellow listeners. I do the same thing with a lot of the music programmes on TV – BBC4 on a Friday evening is a favourite, if I’m at home. I’ve encountered some amazing music brains and some lovely people through tweeting, and even got to meet some of them at a recent ‘Tweet Up’.

What are the best and worst things about being a writer?

The answer’s the same for both – having your work and thoughts out there for the world to see. It’s the best because you get to reach a lot of like-minded people, and hopefully make them smile. There’s nothing better than having people tell you how a piece you’ve written brought back some good memories for them. It’s the worst because I’m actually a very private person (despite being what one DJ described as “all over social media”). Every time I publish something, even if it’s only a blog post, I have an unnerving thirty second panic of feeling totally exposed, before I get a grip and get over myself!

New colours- Natalie's designWe love the design for ‘Your Eighties’, can you tell us a bit about how it came about?

It’s great, isn’t it? Back in the summer, we ran a competition to design the cover for the book. It was won by Natalie Owen, a 24 year designer from Nottingham. Her dad is a big fan of the 80s, and had told her about the competition, having seen me tweet about it. Her design perfectly captures the decade.

Are you doing anything to celebrate when the book is published on 28th November?

Most definitely! The launch party for ‘Your Eighties’ is going to be held at an old music hall in Kent – a fantastic venue. There’s going to be live music from an amazing local band called Skatacus, plus an 80’s disco, with none other than Erkan Mustafa (Grange Hill’s Roland Browning) on the decks. I’m also going to get to meet Natalie, as she’s travelling down for the party. Some of the book’s contributors will be there, along with some wonderful friends and family, so it promises to be a great evening.

What piece of advice would you give to an aspiring writer or even to yourself, if you could go back to before you’d written your first book?

I would say “don’t sweat the small stuff”. With the first book, I got very caught up in the tiniest of details, proper punctuation and having everything ‘perfect’. That’s what editors are for! I also wrote in a very linear fashion, which became very inhibiting. Now, I write freely in chunks, as and when I can, and pull it all together at the end.

‘Your Eighties’ is available for pre-order from 8th November on Amazon here and from the My Eighties online shop in paperback here. Published by Fabrian Books 28th November 2015.

The Wednesday Wondering – What do we have to be nervous about?

Welcome to our first Wednesday Wondering of the new format i.e. a monthly rather than a weekly wondering.

Although I would absolutely love to make writing my career, I need to work full time to pay the mortgage and the bills. For most of my working life, I’ve been in Human Resources in training and/or recruitment roles. I’m currently a Learning & Development Advisor for a food manufacturing company. One of my favourite parts of this role is supporting staff members who have some development needs. Recently, I’ve been coaching someone on presentation skills. This individual is actually a very confident presenter but wanted to work on his presentation content and how to keep his audience interested in his message. However, most people I’ve coached on presentations before are really nervous about standing up and speaking in front of others. A Forbes survey in the USA a few years back revealed that, next to dying, public speaking was the biggest fear people had.

My question to The Write Romantics this week is therefore:

What makes you nervous and why? When was the last time you were really nervous and what did you do (if anything) to overcome the nerves?

Here’s what they said:

 

P1050475Helen R says …

I get nervous flying. The flight from Australia to the UK takes 24 hours and I do my best to tackle the nerves by reading, watching movies and shutting my eyes whilst I daydream the time away. This usually works until there is turbulence which reminds me if where I am, or when I think of recent events involving air travel. During my recent long haul flight I read Hazel Gaynor’s “The Girl Who Came Home” and lost myself in that world for hours 🙂

 

Jay says …

What makes me really nervous?  I suppose it’s the things where I am most bothered about the outcome.  Job interviews, if I really want the role, opening up emails from publishers about novel submissions or getting feedback from others about whether I am ‘good’ at something or not.  All of those things make me nervous to varying extents.  Sometimes public speaking does too, but only when it’s about *me*.  As a lecturer and Chair of multidisciplinary meetings I can be über confident, because it’s professional not personal, but when I have to speak about myself… not so much.  I always think of it as being a bit like Worzel Gummidge, for those of you who remember, and putting on a different head!

However, it is probably the single most important thing in life that makes me most nervous – checks on my health.  Having been diagnosed with cancer in November 2010, I have to undergo six monthly check-ups, which shred my nerves.  I watch the radiographer and consultant’s faces when they are carrying out the tests and imagine that they are looking at me with sympathy and that I’m doomed!  I’m getting a bit braver and went for my last check-up without taking someone’s hand to hold (usually hubby or my mum), but I am not sure I would do it again, as the waiting outside the scanning room was torture.

Things I do to make it better?  Forgetting about it for the six months, in between visits, is the best that I can do.  Oh and hubby hiding the appointment letters until the last minute, so that I don’t have to think about it for too long.  It’s a lesson in life though… next time you’re nervous about that job interview or bit of public speaking, ask yourself this – “what’s the worst that could happen?” – and remind yourself that, whatever it is, it could be a whole lot worse.

 

Harriet says …

Enclosed spaces unnerve me, especially lifts. There was a time when I wouldn’t step inside one, not even accompanied. Now I can, but I’m never comfortable. The worst part, beyond the lift getting stuck which would be my greatest nightmare, is that endless moment between the lift stopping and the doors opening. What I have is claustrophobia, of course. It can happen in all kinds of places, not necessarily in small spaces. I don’t like being in windowless rooms, or anywhere I can’t keep the way out within my sight all the time.

P1050477A couple of years ago I had a course of CBT (cognitive behavioural therapy) at an NHS clinic. I got on quite well and by the end I was sailing up and down in lifts and locking myself in the smallest spaces (yes, I mean public loos!) with hardly any qualms, but it took a lot of practice and concentration. CBT isn’t a cure but it teaches you to replace irrational thoughts with useful ones so that whenever you’re in the fearful situation you have the means to cope. As time has gone on, I’ve become quite laid back over trying to defeat my phobia and now I use a combination of methods to get by. I have the ‘tricks’ my therapist taught me but I also use a tactic which is absolutely wrong in terms of CBT – avoidance. If you continue to avoid a situation, you are fuelling the fear. That’s the theory and it’s true, of course, but I’ve also come to terms with the problem in that I don’t mind that I have it. Claustrophobia is one of the commonest phobias; you hear people all the time saying that they don’t like lifts – you meet them mostly half way up eight flights of stairs – and knowing so many people feel the same kind of makes it all right.

 

Alys says …

There’s quite a lot of things which make me nervous but I’ll talk about the writing related ones. Going to London to meet my agent was pretty terrifying. Even though logically I knew that they wouldn’t want to meet me if they weren’t interested in representing me it didn’t stop me feeling pretty sick going into the meeting. Looking back now I’m surprised that I managed to get through it without spilling my tea or tripping over the carpet.

I rather stupidly did something that was even harder than that earlier in the year when I read aloud at an event organised by York Writers as part of York Literature Festival. It was held in the basement bar at our local arts cinema. I’d told myself that it wasn’t a very big place and I’d be fine. But when I got there it suddenly seemed massive. And it was almost full with nearly 100 people there. The stage was about two inches off the floor and the lights were so bright that I couldn’t see the audience at all. I read the first couple of pages of Beltane and my hands shook all the way through. I guess it was good experience but definitely one I never want to do again.

 

Rachael says …

I tend to worry about traveling. If I have a journey to make, I worry about all sorts of things that could go wrong, even though I know they probably never will. I don’t do this when I book or arrange the trip, but a day or two before – but it hasn’t stopped me going yet! The strange thing about this is that I love to travel, explore new places and meet new people.

 

P1050476And as for me …

It’s one word: confrontations. I can’t bear them. At work, I like to think that I build great relationships with my customers and behave in a way that avoids confrontations but sometimes things are out of my control and someone else does something that means I’m going to have to raise a delicate issue. My stomach does a somersault, my hands go shaky, my heart races and I feel physically sick. Awful. There’s nothing I can do to overcome the nervous feeling; it’s always going to be there in this situation. I think the only way I’d feel better would be if I could cuddle my teddy bear tightly, close my eyes and wish it all away! Unfortunately I’ve had a couple of appalling weeks where I’ve had several confrontations or situations where there could easily be one including a face-to-face one at work and an over-the-phone one with a family member. I’m exhausted as a result!

 

Please join in and let us know what makes you nervous or any coping strategies you can recommend. You’ll find the comments tag at the end of the post tags below.

Thank you.

Jessica xx

Guest Blogger, Claire Haywood, tells us about “New Starts”

It’s coming to that time of the year when we look back and see what we have achieved (or not!) and start to think about the new year. This year, I made a start on writing. It wasn’t something I planned to do. I am a reader, a crazy reader too – I always have at least 3 books on the go and through my book group I have been introduced to lots of different genres, so I’m not fussy about what I read, I’m like a literary magpie. But writing? I guess I may have thought of it, and enjoyed it at school, but I hadn’t made a start.

But then there was Jo. A lovely friend from junior school where we shared desks, a love of learning, whizzing through the English activities, and ponies.

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I was heartbroken when we went to different secondary schools, but life continued and we immediately and inevitably lost touch. This year, I am so thrilled to say that she’s back in my life and we have made a new start on our friendship. We have so many years to talk about, 3 children between us, many ups and downs concerning our lives to share and it is writing that has been the glue. Jo, Write Romantic and writer has lit the fire for my new start – writing.

Typically for me, I started by getting organised. I thought seriously about writing longhand, I love a sharp pencil and some beautiful paper to get my ideas down on, but I realised quickly that this wasn’t going to work. So I bought a lap top, just for my writing. An extravagant gift to myself but one that felt I needed to get started. I read all the old posts on this blog and wondered at the journeys of the writers here, how they made their starts, what they have achieved, the excitement and possibility of being published. All the time I questioned whether that could that ever be me? And then there was the most obvious thing, the thing that I could not organise, I needed an idea. This is where the support from my wonderful Write Romantic friend has been invaluable. Jo allowed me to realise that my prize winning idea, the thing that I was excited about writing and made me sign up for the ride, really wasn’t going to work. So I decided to go back to the drawing board and think about what I could bring to a story by looking at my life experience and now I am decided on my book. The subject is something close to my heart and something I know about, so I am starting from a point of confidence. I am still not sure which direction it is going in, but I understand that this is okay!

I joined the Nano event in November and one evening I wrote my first thousand words. This is where I started to learn about myself as a writer and I realised that for all my organisation I had no idea how to set my ideas out so they look and read like a book. I have lots of characters and getting them into the story was causing me trouble. So, I started again and re-wrote the start of that first chapter. Nobody told me that you have to have guts and bravery for this writing lark, because once you have written a little bit, you need someone to read your words to see if you are on the right track. I chose my English teacher husband, he was there and I needed an immediate answer that he thought my writing was, at the very least, okay. I have never felt more exposed. I couldn’t stay in the room when he was reading and made excuses for my style (shouting from the kitchen!) and the fact that I hadn’t written anything since school. I realised that it actually mattered to me. When I returned to the sitting room, he was smiling, and now I know that I have made that start.

I am not finding it easy. I have a crazy busy job and arrive home most nights far too late to make much of anything. I failed to make the grade with Nano and did not get beyond that first chapter, a very weak effort. We are now moving house and so not much will be achieved in the next few weeks. However, life will settle and I really, really want to try to complete my book. I have amazing support with Jo (who has offered to read for me from now onwards) and my husband who is also a frustrated writer. This blog has been great too as just knowing that others find it a challenge makes me feel like I am among friends.

So, what about next year? Well, I am determined to make some new starts for myself. The first will be to join the New Writers scheme in January – I actually have my alarm set for January the first, I am that determined to get my application in. Then the timescale is set for me, I need to come up with that book and get it finished by August, I am sure that this is something that I can achieve and I have the best part of eight months to get there. Nano in 2014? Yes, I think I will do it again and this will be my second book, for which I already have an idea and change of genre, and that one will be teen fiction. I hope that in the next few years I will be able to add ‘writer’ to the things that I do and I know that when I do get there I will have never felt so proud.

Claire

The Saturday Spotlight – Post Publication Progress!

If anyone read my last post they will know that I had turned into a nervous wreck in the run up to my debut novel ‘The Ghost House’ being published. I had arranged a small launch party because everyone told me I should and I also thought that this was an occasion in my life that should be marked. So I arranged it for the night before the release and I’m so glad I did, it went by in a bit of a blur. Everyone turned up who I’d asked and we filled the lovely, quaint café in the middle of the Abbey to bursting. I felt very humbled when my friends turned up with cards, flowers and gifts. I was the one thanking them but it touched me deeply. It was a lovely experience having so many people I care about in the same room. I didn’t do a reading; I had no need to because I know almost everyone had already ordered my book. I did take some large postcards with the book cover and blurb on the back. And it made me smile when they all wanted one signing, my first and probably last autographs that I’ll ever have to sign.

I was shattered and in bed that night by eleven. I woke up at three in the morning to get a drink of water and made the mistake of checking my Kindle to see if my book had arrived. I wish I hadn’t, I felt my stomach lurch when I saw it on there. This was it. Everyone who had bought it was going to be able to read it. I couldn’t get back to sleep so I ended up in Asda half an hour later, shopping. The good thing was I didn’t have to queue up, at that time in the morning there was only the staff and me. I finally went home and back to bed only to get up at seven, I had to be at work for nine.

I got a Facebook message from a friend to tell me she had been up all night reading my book and couldn’t put it down. She loved it, Phew. I know she probably wouldn’t have said she hated it either but still. I got another message from a friend who was on holiday in Dubai; she was half way through it, couldn’t put it down and loved it. I messaged her to ask, ‘Really?’ She messaged back, ‘Really!’ Work was so busy I barely had time to think about it the rest of the day but I went home and looked to see I had my first five star review on Amazon, oh how I smiled.

The next few days more and more people told me they were reading and loving it, it’s a good job my head didn’t swell up, but I’m not that kind of person. I was just grateful that people who were reading the story I had worked so hard on were enjoying it. My lovely writeromantics have been reading it and they have enjoyed it, I’ve even managed to scare a few people which is what I hoped for, only in the nicest possible way of course but I wanted my book to send chills down peoples spines and it seems to be doing the job.

On twitter I read a tweet by the lovely Donna Trinder who is a book blogger and she tweeted she was reading The Ghost House and didn’t want to put it down, it was AMAZING. That was the pivotal moment for me, it made me realise that actually my book must be pretty good. Today I got a tweet from my publishers The Ghost House had reached #9 in the Amazon Contemporary Horror Chart. I whooped, rushed home to check the computer and saw that the only books in front of mine were by Stephen King, James Herbert and Susan Hill. I have never been so honoured or thrilled in my life. So would I do it all again? YES, YES, YES 🙂

Helen P

Pre-Publishing Nerves

26th September, 2013

Anyone who reads this blog may be aware that earlier on this year I was offered a two book deal with Carina Uk and in seven days to be exact I will be able to call myself a published writer, an author. It’s what I have dreamt about since I was in my early thirties and yes dreams do come true. As long as you work hard enough and never, ever give up.

 So how am I feeling I hear you ask? Let me tell you exactly how I’m feeling. Nervous is probably the most prevalent feeling at the moment, although the nerves are sometimes pushed to the side by a tinge of excitement. Today I met one of our lovely Town Centre Parking Attendants Kev who I haven’t seen for ages. (He also gives the best hugs ever as well as the parking tickets) He had heard through the grapevine about my book and told me he was really pleased for me and was going to download it onto his Kindle for his holiday and was going home to check out Amazon. After our conversation ended I walked away with the biggest grin on my face and it was such an amazing feeling. When I got back to my office I had an email off a colleague who also put a PS on the bottom and said almost the same thing that Kev had said, again I grinned with delight.

I am having a small launch, well more of a thank you party for my family, writing group and friends who have supported me so much these past couple of years. Where the main attraction will be the wonderful cupcakes I’m having made with tiny versions of my book on them. I have no intention of doing anything other than drinking a glass of wine and talking to everyone. You see I promised them all cake if they bought my book so I’ve kept my side of the bargain.

I even finally faced my fears yesterday and went to do a short interview with the most amazing, lovely journalist from the local paper after months of her asking me. Suzanne was fab she put my mind at rest and made it relatively painless. The picture on the other hand was painful. I’m not sure how I manage to cross my eyes and look as if I’ve just been stabbed in the back at the exact moment the flash goes off. It is a special talent.  But it’s done, for better or for worse and they have promised to run the story on the 2nd October when the book is out. What more could I ask for?

I think the thing which makes me nervous is the thought that my story, which has almost been like a fantasy life for me for the last eight years is about to be unleashed into the public domain. Where everyone from my bosses at work to my family and of course the lovely Kev will be able to read the stuff I’ve spent so long writing about, it certainly makes me feel queasy. I keep telling myself that other authors must feel the same and it’s a natural feeling, but I can’t help worry that what should be one of the greatest achievements of my life is being tainted with these nerves. I’m hoping that I’ll be able to push them to the side and enjoy the moment for what it is J

Helen xx

Pitch Perfect

What does the word pitch mean?

1 To throw something.

2 The voice. To hit, the right note.

I have to confess, I am no expert in pitching anything, especially throwing a ball. And I couldn’t hit the right note whilst singing, even if you paid me. Yet in a few weeks, this is something some of us will be doing.

The RNA conference will be here in a few weeks time. This is an opportunity to pitch your novel to the publishing world. This is an occasion to sparkle and wow them. To see the masterpiece you have created finally out in the world. This is the dream of every author.

Now, here is what not to do. I have experience in this area. A few years ago at the RNA winter party, my friend who came with me, nudged me in the direction of an M&B editor. Needless to say, I was terrified. She asked me about my novel, and I told her. It seemed to be going well. It was then, I realised her eyes had glazed over. Not a good sign! It was at this point I decided it was a lost cause. I made my escape as fast as possible. She seemed very relieved.

Then, I went to the conference, and decided to put myself through the agony again.

First of all made sure my first chapter and synopsis were emailed to the editor. Great

Practiced out loud how I would answer questions thrown at me.

Two days before the conference I had an email asking me, if I had sent a chapter for the editor to look at. Panic set in, I double checked, and decided to send another copy. Still no luck! She hadn’t received it. Now what was I going to do? By now I could see my chance slipping away. At this point my nerves had kicked in. They decided to have a bit of a meltdown. This is another area that I do have experience in.

It was the day before the conference still the editor hadn’t received my chapter! By this time my nails were bitten, and I had started to pull my hair out. Gone was any thought about the weekend ahead. I was absorbed with this one interview, the one occasion where I might be able to shine. By this time I didn’t even have a hint of a sparkle about me. Nervous and wreck come to mind, and I hadn’t even seen anyone yet. Then it happened. The editor told me to bring a hard copy of my work with me. She would try and read it between interviews. At this point, I felt relief and nervous, all for a different reason.

So on the interview day, I stood with all the other people waiting to tell their story. My hands were sweaty, and I felt sick and my mouth felt parched and dry. Hearing my name called I walked in, and so began my first pitch.

Though there were a few disasters along the way. At the end I felt really positive. Even if you feel the pitch was a complete disaster, it doesn’t matter. The main thing is that you have stepped out and you have tried. Maybe practice makes perfect. So I encourage everyone this year to go for it, regardless how you feel. Sometimes we have to do step out and do it, even if we feel afraid.

Lorraine x